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Economist Full-time MBA ranking 2014

Last week's results place Henley Business School at 34th in the world, 8th in Europe and 2nd in the UK. This demonstrates a consistent and strong improvement over the last three years and sees Henley ranked as one of only three British Business Schools in the world’s top 40.

The Economist ranks the world’s top 100 schools based on two surveys:

  1. The composition and quality of students, faculty and programme
  2. Alumni and current participants’ evaluation of their experience at Henley including;
  • Career development
  • Salary increase
  • Quality and diversity of Faculty members
  • Ability and dynamism of the participants
  • Strength of the international alumni network

These rankings reflect Henley’s focus on delivering world-class programmes to international audiences and confirms its reputation as one of the world’s leading players in global business education – something we have been providing for the last 70 years.

For more information please visit the Henley Business School website

Published 13 October 2014
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