Dr Carol Padgett

'Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

  • Associate Professor in Finance
  • Head of ICMA Centre
  • Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

Contact details

Profile & Expertise

Carol has worked at the ICMA Centre since 1998. During that time she has held a variety of roles and is currently the Programme Director of the MSc in Corporate Finance as well as the Head of ICMA Centre. Her teaching and research interests are in Corporate Finance and Governance, and she has supervised both PhD and DBA students in these fields.

Carol has been a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy since 2016.

 

Specialisms

  • Corporate Finance
  • Corporate Governance

Key publications, books, research & papers

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Article

Perspective of corporate governance and ethical issues with profit sharing investment accounts in Islamic banks

Alhammadi, S., Archer, S. , Padgett, C. and Abdel Karim, R. A. (2018) Perspective of corporate governance and ethical issues with profit sharing investment accounts in Islamic banks. Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, 26 (3). pp. 406-424. ISSN 1358-1988 doi: https://doi.org/10.1108/jfrc-01-2017-0014

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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the practices of Islamic banks in managing the so-called profit sharing investment accounts (PSIA) which they offer as a Shari’ah-compliant alternative to interest-bearing deposit accounts using an unrestricted Mudarabah contract. In particular, the paper aims to examine the risk-return characteristics of such accounts and to compare these to the returns and risks of shareholders in the same banks. It is relevant that PSIA holders (unrestricted investment account holders – UIAH) are exposed to losses on the assets in which their deposits are invested, while the bank as asset manager (Mudarib) does not bear these losses and as Mudarib typically receives more than 50 per cent of the profits earned on the PSIA. The issue is whether the UIAH are being treated equitably. The influence of a set of corporate governance variables on this issue was also analyzed. Design/methodology/approach A sample of 28 Islamic banks was selected from five countries for the period 2002-2013, with data being obtained from Bankscope and Bloomberg and, where necessary, from the banks’ annual reports. First, the risk-return characteristics of the UIAHs’ rates of return and shareholders’ rates of return on equity (ROE) were compared by calculating for each bank the coefficients of variation (CV) of the two series of rates of return. Second, a panel data approach was used to evaluate the effectiveness of corporate governance by examining the extent to which the size of the difference between the rates of return for shareholders and for UIAH was associated with a set of corporate governance variables. Third, a comparison was made between the risk-return characteristics of UIAH’s rates of return and shareholders’ dividend yield rate for a sub-sample of 20 banks for which the information was available. Findings For a significant proportion of the banks (9 out of 28), the CVs of the PSIA returns were higher than those of the shareholders’ ROEs, which suggested that in these cases the PSIA holders were receiving inequitable treatment. Likewise, for 7 out of the 20 banks in the sub-sample, the CVs of the PSIA holders’ rates of return were higher than those of the shareholders’ dividend yield rate. In explaining the size of the differences between the rates of return on PSIA and the shareholders’ ROEs, the variable with the greatest explanatory power was the return on assets, implying that when this was high the bank took a maximum Mudarib share of profits. Some other corporate governance variables had the expected signs, as did a country dummy representing the maturity of the market for Islamic banking, but there was little evidence of the effectiveness of corporate governance in protecting the interests of the UIAH. Research limitations/implications A limitation of the research was that the inefficiency of the stock markets in the relevant countries and the fact that a few of the banks were not listed made it impossible to use shareholders’ stock market returns. ROE is not a very good proxy, as it is unclear how much value should be placed on retained earnings. Dividend yield rates provide a better comparison with UIAH rates of return, but the data were available for only 20 of the banks. Nevertheless, the results of the analysis strongly suggest that in a significant proportion of cases, UIAH are not being treated equitably. Practical implications The implication is that the regulation of Islamic banks needs to be improved to provide better protection to UIAH. Social implications Islamic banks operate mainly in emerging markets where the effectiveness of regulation is limited. The ethical basis of Islamic finance provides some mitigation of this problem but apparently fails to do so in a significant proportion of cases. This should be borne in mind when assertions are made about the ethical basis of Islamic finance. Originality/value There is a dearth of empirical studies of the practices of Islamic banks and in particular of their treatment of their customers. This is because of various factors: the relative novelty of Islamic finance, the paucity of data and the relatively small size of the body of researchers in the field. This paper aims to contribute to filling this gap.

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Article

Corporate governance, bank mergers and executive compensation

Liu, Y., Padgett, C. and Varotto, S. (2017) Corporate governance, bank mergers and executive compensation. International Journal of Finance & Economics, 22 (1). pp. 12-29. ISSN 1099-1158 doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/ijfe.1565

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Using a sample of US bank mergers from 1995 to 2012, we observe that the pre-post merger changes in CEO bonus are significantly negatively related to the strength of corporate governance within the bidding bank. This suggests that bonus compensation is not consistent with the “optimal contracting hypothesis”. Salary changes, on the other hand, are not affected by corporate governance which is in line with “optimal contracting”. We also find that good governance is associated with more accretive deals for the bidder. Overall, our results are consistent with the notion that, unlike salary and long-term compensation, bonus compensation is not aligned with value creation and is more vulnerable to CEO manipulation in banks with poor corporate governance.

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Dr Simone Varotto

Dr Simone Varotto

Postgraduate Programme Area Director, Programme Director of BSc Finance and Management, Programme Co-Director of MSc Finance and Financial Technology (FinTech)

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Book or Report Section

Corporate governance and supervision: from Basel II to Basel III

Padgett, C. (2013) Corporate governance and supervision: from Basel II to Basel III. In: Archer, S. and Abdel Karim, F. (eds.) Islamic finance: the new regulatory challenge. Wiley, Singapore, pp. 401-414. ISBN 9781118247044

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Book

Corporate governance: theory and practice

Padgett, C. (2011) Corporate governance: theory and practice. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, pp240. ISBN 9780230229990

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Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Article

Operating performance and its relationship to market performance of Chinese initial public offerings

Chi, J. and Padgett, C. (2006) Operating performance and its relationship to market performance of Chinese initial public offerings. Chinese Economy, 39 (5). pp. 28-50. ISSN 1097-1475 doi: https://doi.org/10.2753/CES1097-1475390502

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Article

The performance and long-run characteristics of the Chinese IPO market

Chi, J. and Padgett, C. (2005) The performance and long-run characteristics of the Chinese IPO market. Pacific Economic Review, 10 (4). pp. 451-469. ISSN 1361-374X doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0106.2005.00285.x

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Article

Short-run underpricing and its characteristics in Chinese initial public offering (IPO) markets

Chi, J. and Padgett, C. (2005) Short-run underpricing and its characteristics in Chinese initial public offering (IPO) markets. Research in International Business and Finance, 19 (1). pp. 71-93. ISSN 0275-5319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ribaf.2004.10.004

Dr Carol Padgett

Dr Carol Padgett

Head of ICMA Centre, Programme Director: MSc Corporate Finance

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Our faculty regularly attend a wide range of events across the globe to share their research and expertise, as well as meeting new students. Use the map below to find past and upcoming events in your region.

Taught modules

Mergers and Acquisitions

The objective of the module is to introduce students to the technical and practical aspects of Mergers and Acquisitions. It focuses on several corporate valuation methods, how to identify and value synergies as well as the financing process of an acquisition. Selected case studies will help students…

The objective of the module is to introduce students to the technical and practical aspects of Mergers and Acquisitions. It focuses on several corporate valuation methods, how to identify and value synergies as well as the financing process of an acquisition. Selected case studies will help students…

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